Sunday, May 23, 2010

Jim Byers on Hypercat

Jim Byers has become a valued resource and contributor to my developer blogs. Jim's testing methodology is straightforward and unflinching; if there's a way for Jim to get what he wants out of a developer, he'll find it. I recommended a 1:10:300 dilution of Hypercat as a standard dilution for processing most films to normal contrast in a normal development time. Jim found this scheme didn't give him the kind of negatives he wants, so rather than turn his back and proclaim the developer doesn't work as it should, Jim went about making it work for him by adjusting the ratio of part A to part B to 1:5 instead of 1:10. This tactic seems to be working for Jim, as evidenced by the photos below.

Thanks again, Jim, for contributing to the small reservoir of knowledge about these developers.

Jim’s comments:

My main interest in Hypercat is it’s sharpness. But I also want the fine grain of a Pyro developer. Hypercat has delivered both for me.

I originally tried for high sharpness using a 1:10:300 dilution of Hypercat, agitating every 3 minutes. While the sharpness was extremely good, I found that I was losing highlight detail and the negatives were coming out with too much contrast. Jay suggested I try reducing the solution B concentration to a 1:5:300 dilution and extending the development time. This has produced excellent results. The negatives are sharp with very good tones. There is nice highlight and shadow detail.

The recommended high sharpness/acutance starting point is to use a 1:5:300 dilution of Hypercat with a development time that is 1.25x 510-Pyro’s development time. Use continuous inversions for the first 30 seconds and then 10 second agitations every 3 minutes.

I really like this developer. It has a nice crispness while still maintaining a small grain size.

Here is an example with Tri-X 400:









Film: Tri-X 400

EI: 400

Format: 35mm

Developer: Hypercat

Dilution: 1:5:300

Time: 9 min

Temp: 21C/70F

Agitation: Continuous inversions for the first 30 seconds and then 10 seconds agitation every 3 minutes Presoak: 3 minute water presoak

Fixer: TF-4

Here is a Fomapan 200 example:


Film: Fomapan 200

EI: 200

Format: 35mm

Camera/Lens – Fed2/Jupiter-12

Developer: Hypercat

Dilution: 1:5:300

Time: 7.5 min

Temp: 21C/70F

Agitation: Continuous inversions for the first 30 seconds and then 10 seconds agitation every 3 minutes Presoak: 3 minute water presoak

Fixer: TF-4

4 comments:

Dennis O'Connor said...

I really appreciate the information given freely by Jay and Jim. As an amateur photographer, albeit a serious one, I lack the 'technical' background for compiling developers. That is why this site is invaluable to people like me. I have a 'curious' mind. I want to know why, or how something works. It is only because generous people freely give the information that explains how to do it that allows me to get better at this very interesting process.

Thank you both.

Dennis

Dennis said...

I really appreciate the information given freely by Jay and Jim. As an amateur photographer, albeit a serious one, I lack the 'technical' background for compiling developers. That is why this site is invaluable to people like me. I have a 'curious' mind. I want to know why, or how something works. It is only because generous people freely give the information that explains how to do it that allows me to get better at this very interesting process.

Jim. I really like the contrast and gradation on that Foma 200 film.

Thank you both.

Dennis

jdef said...

Thank you, Dennis, for your generous compliment. I value and truly appreciate your feedback and encouragement, as I do Jim's impressive contributions. Thank you both!

Jim said...

Hi Dennis,
I have certainly benefited from information and tips others have supplied and I am happy to be able to give back. I am very glad you found the information useful.